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The Shield

The moments of tomorrow

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The world we live in is a big joke.

We literally reside in a living punch line.

If you take a moment just to see the irony and humor behind world events you might give off a chuckle.

Everyone who is anyone on this planet knows that our globe is warming.

The atmosphere is heating up, which might be due to the hot heads we call ‘world leaders.’

Anyhow, this is affecting important things like sea levels; polar bears are basically becoming homeless because of us.

Instead of worrying about the globes thermostat, our country in particular has bigger things to attend to like constantly fretting over our dear president not releasing his tax documents, or the intentional reversing of LBGTQ rights, and of course wondering what in the world the blessed Kardashians are keeping up with.

Sure nuclear weapons are being produced like shiny new toys on a Toys R’ Us shelf, but God forbid kids play violent video games in their free time.

All of this translates to priorities and what people care mostly about.

It seems these may, perhaps be a little skewed from what is really important.

Sure, polar bears might be extinct in the near future, but as long as Donald Trump is president, let’s criticize what he orders for dinner rather than focusing on bigger things.

Most people seem to be aware of big world issues, but at the same time are too ignorant or unwilling to care about them as much as they should.

It all comes down to the phrase “How  does it benefit me?”

A selfish phrase, but true nonetheless.

It literally must take someone to be slapped in the face with an issue for them to streamline their efforts into helping or resolving it.

Drunk driving is an everyday occurrence, yet not until someone is personally affected by it do they become an advocate to putting a stop to it.

This attitude or ethic of concern is what we need to change in our world today.

Instead of waiting to care until an issue affects you directly, we all should be advocates for the well-being of others and our planet.

If we all become passionate about stopping or reversing big world issues, our world will become a better home for us all to live longer in.

Living in the moment is grand and all, but I want to live in the moments of tomorrow too.

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University of Southern Indiana's student publication
The moments of tomorrow