Rock the college vote

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If one couldn’t already tell by scrolling through Facebook, watching TV or not living under a rock, it’s an election year.

For many college students, myself included, this will be our first time voting in a presidential election. To prepare for it, I have been doing my research for more than a year.

It is especially important  this year that voters research the candidates and use common sense to decide whom they are going to vote for. More importantly, college students need to vote.

Statistically, our age demographic has a low voter turnout. As slightly adulty adults, we will be the ones to feel the effects of the choices made by whoever becomes our next president.

We have the right to vote, but also the obligation to attempt to enact the change that we think is needed, whatever that change may be.

I know who I am going to vote for in the primaries and who I will vote for if my candidate does not get the nomination for my chosen political party. Do you?

Here are some ways to become informed:

Register to vote.

In Indiana, April 4 is the last day to register to vote for the primaries, so you still have time. To register to vote you can go to your local BMV, online at Indianavoters.com or through the free app “Indiana Voters.”

If you are not sure whether or not you are registered, you can search for your voter registration on Indianavoters.com.

Consider your political affiliation.

Research more than just Democrat and Republican politics. Remember, you can be an independent.

Think about what issues are most important and whom you side with on those issues. In Indiana, voters are not required to list their political affiliation when registering, but it is required to choose a party’s ballot at the primaries.

Research the candidates in your party and the opposing party.

Not only do you need to know which candidate to vote for, but you also need a general idea of who is in the election. Doing your research is part of being an informed voter.

Choose your candidate(s).

From your research, you should decide who best fits your political views. It’s also a good idea to pick a back-up candidate in case your preferred candidate does not make it to the general election.

One way to better understand whom you most closely side with in this election is an easy online quiz, which can be found on Isidewith.com.

Once you’ve done all your research, the last and most important thing you need to do is vote. America needs more educated young voters, no matter where their political affiliations lie. Do your duty as a citizen and be an informed voter.

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