Women gather to learn about different sororities

Shannon Hall

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Several women gather at the Sorority Meet-N-Greet Thursday night to learn about the different sororities on campus.  Photo by SHANNON HALL/ The Shield

Several women gather at the Sorority Meet-N-Greet Thursday night to learn about the different sororities on campus.
Photo by SHANNON HALL/ The Shield

Freshmen Whitney Crawford wants to “get involved.”

The pre-dental major said she wants to be a part of the USI community – so she decided to come to the Sorority Meet-N-Greet.

As 6 p.m. hit, more than 30 women flooded the lower level of UC East to meet and learn about the different sororities on campus.

Crawford said she’s unsure she wants to be in one, but she’s looking into it.

Freshmen sisters Rilee and Kalyn Mathies both agreed with Crawford about wanting to get involved.

“I think it would be an amazing experience,” Rilee said. “It’s a tight-knit community, which is just perfect.”

The Meet-N-Greet gives the women time to learn about the sororities on campus, said Christina Carranza, who is a part of Rho Sigma.

Rho Sigmas are recruitment counselors who cannot reveal their sorority to help possible recruits with an unbiased opinion.

“It gives them a one-on-one person interaction,” Carranza said.

With recruitment week coming up Sept. 12-16, she said it gives the women a chance to know a details about the sorority they wouldn’t have time for during recruitment week.

“It’s overwhelming,” she said. “It’s face-paced, and so it’s hard to learn all this during the short amount of time.”

Although many freshmen women showed up at the Meet-N-Greet, sorority recruitment isn’t just for freshmen.

Last year, sophomore Brook Vaal focused on her studies, but this year she wants to get “the experience.”

“My sister was in a sorority at UE, and she told me that it’s the experience that everybody should have,” she said.

The biology major said she wants to get out in the community more.

“It’s more than what people think,” Vaal said. “It’s more community involvement than anything.”

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