Rap changes from club songs to love songs

Ariana Beedie

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Rap is going in a new direction. Artists like Jay-Z and Kanye West are paving new ways for artists, with innovation.

One artist that is following along with this new wave is Drake. The last couple years Drake has come a long way from his Toronto home and Canadian television.

Signed to label, Young Money, Drake released an album and has been featured on many songs with various artists across the board. His premier album “Thank Me Later,” gave listeners a taste of who Drake was, or who he thought he was in the beginning of his rap career.

Now in 2011, Drake has evolved. His second album titled, Take Care was released Nov. 15, and already has taken radio airwaves by storm. This album differs from his first by welcoming listeners into his “private room” of sorts.

There is an underlying melancholy feeling throughout the entire composition. Like legend Notorious B.I.G said, “Mo Money, Mo Problems.”

Featured artists include Nicki Minaj, Rhianna, Rick Ross, Lil Wayne and many others. There have been mixed views about his album because some fans who are used to Drake going hard on all his songs are have trouble with this slower paced album.

Track after track, the production quality is something to be marveled over. Drake brings the listener close with emotional lyrics with tales from behind the scenes.

I love the slower tracks, which consume the majority of the album, because they are so personal. It is apparent that there have been some stops on his way to the top where he’s knocked his head with women, fans and other compromising situations.

Are these his redemption songs? Completely taking a whole new approach on the rhyme game, as a rap fan, this is astounding. I am proud to say that I have respect for rappers like Drake, Kanye West and Jay-Z.

These rappers have come and changed the game completely. No more club songs, dance songs, no more jokes. Rap legend Nas said “Hip Hop is Dead” because mainstream had taken a turn for the worst.

But these compositions are something different, a future classic. Decoding different lyrics throughout all the songs really make me feel for Drake. Loved and lost. Two feelings very extreme and supreme.

Sadly one doesn’t come without the other, it’s only a matter of time before the companion shows it’s other side. These experiences relate so much to everyone’s life. Songs like “Marvin’s Room” and “Take Care” give critical insight into the ugly side of fame.

“Take Care” compares to another innovative rap album, Kanye West’s “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy,” released in 2010. There is one thing clear about both of these albums, and that is rap is taking a new direction, and rappers are considering more thoughtful lyrics, not just club songs.

Reflecting not only what is happening the artist, but within the artist. If you cannot appreciate this album, maybe it just wasn’t meant for you. But if you listen carefully, and he touches on an experience you’ve had, then I think you should give him another chance.

Just another reason why this album is so supreme. Reading the production credits, scanning by Lil Wayne’s name I had to ask myself. Why was this album better than his own “Carter IV”?

Maybe his album is for a different crowd. Maybe Lil Wayne just doesn’t have these same feelings Drake would have to create an album like this. Another astonishing point about hip-hop, every rapper is different. From old school to new school, and within all the sub genres inside hip hop, everyone is different.

These little different quirks are what makes the music great. These songs are intended to make the listener reflect on life, and past situations. Hearts broken and tears wiped away.

Keeping the listener aware that they are not the only alone in their thoughts, when in fact one would feel alone. Take Care is the album of the season. I recommend it to anyone who considers themselves a fan of rap. Even though this album is different, it is real.

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