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A pop-punk perfected performance

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From the opening acts to Twenty One Pilots, the Emotional Roadshow concert fulfilled my “HeavyDirtySoul.”

Twenty One Pilots opened its set by projecting the nine circles from the “Blurryface” album cover onto a black curtain covering the stage.

A face then appeared on the black curtain and said “Yo, this song will never be on the radio even if my clique were to pick and the people were to vote. It’s the few, the proud and the emotional.”

As soon as the word emotional left the the face’s lips, the black curtain fell down and the crowd rushed the barricade shouting the lyrics to “Fairly Local” with Tyler Joseph.

The night was non-stop action. Costume changes and Joseph disappearing from the main stage and ending up in the “nosebleed” seating area left crowd members fully immersed in the concert experience.

After a few exciting pop-punk performances, Josh Dun started a drum solo as Joseph made his way into the pit, relying on the hands of screaming fans to hold him up as he sang. He began to sing “Migraine,” occasionally pointing his microphone to the crowd as they shouted his lyrics back to him.

I have to admit there was a point where my dreams of having an interaction with one of my musical heroes happened when Joseph ran over my hands and head in his “hamster” ball during his last round around the pit.

When I thought my night couldn’t get any better, the platform to hold Joseph’s drum for “Trees” during the finale, touched my hand. As I grabbed on, Joseph climbed on and ended up less than two feet away from me.

I’ll be honest and say it made me slightly emotional to see someone I look up to so much right in front of my eyes.

Joseph and Dun started hitting their drums with water on the top in sync as the pit was sprayed with water and masses of confetti fell from the arena fell onto the pit.

At the end, Joseph stood up, put his hand on his chest and gestured the mallet to the crowd as he smiled and mouthed “thank you.” He then crouched down to the pit and screamed with the pit resulting in louder screams.

As soon as Joseph and Dun reached the stage they put their arms around each other bowed and then said the iconic line “We are Twenty One Pilots and so are you.”

Out of all the concerts I’ve been to, I can honestly say this was the best by far. I can barely put into words how incredible it was to experience them performing live.

Truly an amazing pop-punk perfected performance.

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University of Southern Indiana's student publication
A pop-punk perfected performance