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The beauty behind a beastly argument

Giri Tristanto

Giri Tristanto

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The 2017 rendition of “Beauty and the Beast” has a gay character, and everyone has been going back and forth about it.

Though we may disagree about it, we need to acknowledge that the content isn’t harmful to us; certainly not in the ways we might think.

Let me take a moment to talk about another film entirely— “Robocop.”

“Robocop” is one of my all-time favorite films. I basically grew up watching it. When I saw the trailer for the remake, I was taken aback.

“No! It won’t be the same! They’re going to ruin the franchise!”

The same franchise whose third installment couldn’t get Peter Weller to reprise his titular role, and then hired an actor who literally did not fit in the suit.

It turned out the remake just wasn’t for me. Watching it, though, I ultimately learned it was okay it wasn’t for me.

The original, the one I grew up with, was still enjoyable, even if I didn’t enjoy the newer version.

Everyone my age and older, listen up. We already have our “Beauty and the Beast.”

It came out in 1991.

We were raised on different ideals from the kids of today, which were mirrored in the films we watched. The movies of 2017 reflect the ideals children today are growing up with.

This remake, with its gay character and its live action cast, takes nothing from us.

If anything, it provides so much to the up-and-coming filmgoers.

There’s certainly something there that wasn’t there before, but even if we are unhappy about it, and some of us are, we still have the story we grew up with, and that isn’t going away.

The purpose this new film serves, as with any remake these days, is to retell the original’s story; not to us, per se, but to the people who will inherit the world from us.

This new generation of Americans are learning that people are people, no matter their differences. All-inclusivity is important to them, and it will never not be important.

To make the diminutive, goofball yes-man to the ridiculously macho antagonist of a Disney film gay is to help reinforce that idea.

Even if, personally, I think LeFou could do better.

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The beauty behind a beastly argument